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The Fall Feasts

Written by Leon Clymer on . Posted in Festivals

To those of us not reared in the traditions of Judaism, the significance of Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, and Sukkot can be a bit perplexing.

As a Messianic Gentile, I am led by the Holy Spirit to observe these feasts because we are commanded to do so by the LORD. However, that same Spirit cautions me against following the traditions of men which inhabit the modern-day observances of these feasts. I believe that, in Messianic Judaism, we have the opportunity to restore the spiritual content of these sacred occasions. We must return to the spiritual roots of these great feasts, and align them with The Chief Cornerstone (Rosh Pinah), Yeshua the Messiah.

Feast of Trumpets (Rosh Hashanah) is a "wake-up call". Trumpets can sound alarm or celebration. I believe the trumpets are calling us to return to the LORD, and that Yeshua and the Messianic Age is coming soon. Trumpets are sounded in the presence of royalty and we are to acknowledge that the LORD GOD is the King of our lives. The Feast of Trumpets should also sound an alarm to reach the unsaved, especially those in our own families. This feast should be a great awakening on the part of GOD’s people to the blast of His shofar.

Yom Kippur, (Day of Atonement) should be celebrated as a day of gratitude unto GOD for providing both our High Priest and our final sin offing in the person of Yeshua the Messiah. Yom Kippur can also be a day of atonement between ourselves, GOD, and our fellowman. If anything is wrong in our relationship with GOD, or in our relationship with the people around us, This is the day to make things right. If the tradition of fasting is observed, it should be accompanied by prayers for the "lost sheep of the House of Israel" and for the nation of Israel itself, that they may turn to the Messiah of Israel for their salvation. Yom Kippur should be a great day of prayer for the Jewish people to not only have their sins covered, but washed away by the blood of the Lamb.

Sukkot (Tabernacles) is to be celebrated as the birth of the Messiah Yeshua, as well as our "Thanksgiving Day". In that day, Sukkot will once again be known as the "Great Feast", as it was in biblical times.

In obedience to scripture (Lev. 23: 41-43), we are to build shelters and dwell in them. If this is not possible, at least one meal a day should be eaten in your sukkah (shelter) to remind you of GOD’s provision and deliverance. Sukkot is a time of rejoicing, singing and dancing before the LORD. After the "wake-up call" of the Feast of Trumpets and the atoning peace of Yom Kippur, Sukkot is the culmination of our joy in knowing that we are blessed beyond measure through GOD’s grace and His gift of Yeshua of Nazareth, our Messiah!